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7,669 Views 2 Replies Last post: Aug 23, 2010 9:40 PM by TonySong RSS
2 posts since
Aug 22, 2010
Currently Being Moderated

Aug 23, 2010 4:56 PM

OXYDHQ AND ZEOLITE

My husband has tumours in his stomch and heart. He refuses to have hospital treatment and has now become agonisingly thin. I'm trying desperately to find alternative drugs and supplements and came across OxyDhq and Zeolite to oxyginate cells and change ph levels, but as yet I haven't brought them. Has anyone tried these supplements or know of anyone who has? Please share your knowledge and experience.

 

Kathryn.

harryeleri 1,220 posts since
Apr 28, 2010
Currently Being Moderated
1. Aug 23, 2010 9:11 PM in response to: kathryn
Re: OXYDHQ AND ZEOLITE

 

I do take herbal supplements but would not try the ones you mention.this is just my personal choice.There are other products that could be tried that are not as bizzare,have a chat with your GP. or Mcmillan nurses.

 

 

Good luck to you both,it is so frustrating to watch someone suffer and not be able to help.Keep posting so that we can offer you some support.

 

 

Rose xxx

 

 

1,879 posts since
Dec 23, 2009
Currently Being Moderated
2. Aug 23, 2010 9:40 PM in response to: kathryn
Re: OXYDHQ AND ZEOLITE

Kathryn,

 

Welcome Kathryn, sorry you have the need to come on here but a good decision as we can support you through your and your husbands journey.

 

Firstly, do you have any reasons why your husband is refusing hospital treatment...the point to note is that some 'alternative' treatments can be as toxic as traditional therapies so best do all the research you can find prior to taking anything.

 

The cancer research site has some details that may assist:

 

http://www.cancerhelp.org.uk/about-cancer/cancer-questions/what-is-cellular-zeolite

 

Good luck

 

Tony

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